Disorders

Actual cases diagnosed and photographed though one of our comprehensive eye examinations

Note: All of these photos are of patients seen at our office. Many of these are of the extreme case and are not meant to alarm you but only to educate you on the amount of information the eye can provide to the trained observer.

HYPERTENSION:









                       NORMAL RETINA
 






 
Extreme high blood pressure (260/160: the patient thinks reading glasses will correct the problem. Notice all the bleeding. This patient is at high risk for stroke.   Chronic, low grade high blood pressure: Notice at 12:00 how the lighter vessel pinches off the darker vessel.
     
     
CORNEAL ABRASION   PTERYGIUM
 
Corneal abrasion from a patient sleeping in their contacts.   Excessive drying caused by wind and sun. Very common in southwestern United States. This needs to be surgically excised.
     
     
STYE   GPC
(Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis)
 
Very inflamed stye was treated with eye drops and oral antibiotics.   White bumps on underside of lid from a dirty contact lens. This is NOT contagious.
     
HERPES EYE INFECTION   CORNEAL ULCER
 
Patient, who a week prior had a cold sore, ended up with Herpes (viral) eye infection.   Residual scar (gray-white circle) of a corneal ulcer. This patient was hospitalized in order to save the eye.
     
     
RETINAL DETACHMENT
 
Beginning retinal detachment. Notice the lighter color at the top left of the picture between 10:30 and 12:30. Our digital photography enables one to see the whitish curved line which is the leading edge of the detachment. This patient was immediately referred for retinal surgery which took place 5 hours later and today is perfectly fine.
     
 
Advanced retinal detachment: This patient waited 1 week before coming to the office. Unfortunately, even after surgery, this patient lost most of the vision in this eye.
     
DIABETIC RETINOPATHY (DIABETES)
 
Advanced retinal detachment: This patient waited 1 week before coming to the office. Unfortunately, even after surgery, this patient lost most of the vision in this eye.
     
NORMAL EYE:
 
The lighter circle at 3 o'clock is the optic nerve (also 3:00 in the graphic). The darker orange color in the center is the macula. The "tree branches" are the blood vessels. The light ones are the arteries; the darker color shows the veins. Notice the rather uniform orange color, and there are no spots outside the blood vessels.
     
MACULAR DEGENERATION
 
Early macular degeneration: Notice the yellow spots in the center of the picture (by the macula).   Advanced macular degeneration
     
 
End stage dry macular degeneration   Wet form (bleeding) of macular degeneration
     
BRAIN TUMOR: (Papilledema)   STROKE
 
The optic nerve looks puffy and swollen. You can hardly see it. The outer circumference is poorly defined. This patient thought he needed stronger glasses for night driving.   This is called a branch vein occlusion, which is a clogged vein in the retina. This is essentially a mild stroke which occurred in the back of the eye. Notice the spots (bleeding) at center.
     
GLAUCOMA:
 
Notice the large white center in the middle of the optic nerve (yellowish circle).   Norman healthy optic nerve
     
PINGQUECULA   SUBCONJUNTIVAL HEMORRAGE
 
Bump or growth on the white of the eye (sclera) caused by wind and sun. Usually has no effect on vision.   This was caused by sneezing and is usually harmless. It will completely heal in 1-3 wks.
     
PRE-RETINAL HEMORRAGE   HISTO PLASMOSIS
 
Spontaneous hemorrhage in the back of the eye. Patient saw a shadow in the line of sight.   This patient grew up along a river and, as a child, ingested pigeon dung. This fungus usually settles in the lungs and sometimes in the eye. The disease shows up as the white punched out spots.
     
CORNEAL WARPAGE (KERATOCONUS)
 
Notice the perfectly circular rings on the left photo. Notice the distorted rings on the right photo. This patient cannot get clear vision with glasses and must be fit with a rigid gas permeable lens or face corneal transplant surgery. (Photo taken at Skowron Eye Care with a corneascope)
     
CATARACT LENS IMPLANT   CORNEAL NEO VASCULARIZATION
 
    Notice the blood vessels growing into the cornea due to complications from contact lenses

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